Letters

Dear Editor


Corobrik: a family affair
In response to the letter (nose192) by C Roberts, “Listen up ye execs”, and your article in nose191, I as a Corobrik insider can confirm that although Allin Dangers did not get his desired promotion, Corobrik has employed two of his sons, probably as a reward for being the trigger man in getting rid of loyal colleagues the way he did. These two pale males were appointed against Corobrik’s affirmative action policies.

Meanwhile, Corobrik ex-CEO and now part-time chairman – though more often to be found playing golf at Mount Edgcombe – Peter du Trevou, has allowed his son Christopher to be unilaterally appointed as the company’s Management Accountant – and a junior executive board member, without advertising the position either internally or externally. 

The Department of Labour and/or the Minister of Mineral Resources [they mine clay] need to look into the dubious employment practices at Corobrik, as do major shareholders Investec (Board members P Amm, G Hirschowitz and R Baker are Investec’s men) and – of moral compass fame – Reuel Khoza of AKA Capital.

The moral compass certainly needs to be re-calibrated at Horobrik… err… Corobrik.

Insider
Durban

Disappointed aliens

Desiree Erasmus’s report on how the blurring of secular conspiracy and the Christian Fringe’s interpretations of biblical prophecy has led to an increase in the internet orgy of predictophiles from religious and secular sources (nose192, Holy Father phone home) would explain why we haven’t been contacted by aliens. Clearly, there’s not enough intelligence on Earth (Noseweek readers excepted, of course) to make the effort worthwhile.

Elio Boezio
Port Elizabeth

Is Capitec the only one?

“Capitec just another Big Brother bank?” Your article cautioning readers to read the small print before signing up for a Capitec account was most interesting. It would be nice to have the same magnifying-glass look at all the other big banks’ fine print!

Don Pearce
Noordhoek

Back-biting boys’ clubs

You omitted to mention Kelvin Grove amongst the still-surviving old gentlemen’s clubs (The long goodbye, nose192). I have been a member there for 45 years. It seems to be a very successful club; young keep coming in and the old stay on...  Surely all could see that “boys only” gentleman’s clubs couldn’t last; those days are long gone.

 Considering the costs that you mentioned and the debts they have, surely gentlemen of that era (for whom I have great respect) can go to very nice five-star hotels and have exclusivity there?

All said, it is sad to see them go...

Chris White
East London

â–º  Why on earth would anyone want to belong to such a back-biting low-life outfit as the Cape Town Club (Breaking the rules, nose192)?  Suzanne should consider herself lucky to be out of it!

Mike Turner
Johannesburg

â–º  I’m kinda glad to hear that these private elite clubs (CT Club, Rand Club, etc) are moving on and being forced to become part of the real SA!

I was told to organise an event at the Rand Club in Johannesburg in about 1987 when I was a manager at the JHB Chamber of Commerce (the first woman manager of the Chamber movement – imagine that!) and was told I’d have to use the side door to gain entry to the club. Well, suffice it to say between my (woman) colleague and me a different venue – where we were treated as people – got the business.

Perhaps those old boys can see where their policies led – to insolvency and downsizing.

Pam Herr
Sun Valley
 
PO another colonial invention

The collapse of the South African Post Office (Post-mortem for the Post Office, nose192): It’s a case of a government ship full of idiots steered by a captain who hasn’t the faintest clue as to why the ship is sinking. But who cares anyway? It’s just another one of those dumb colonial inventions that nobody needs.

We’ll take the money though, until it dries up and then we all can be promoted to other positions to see off further irrelevant colonial inventions.

A Dryburgh
Durban North

Old story: new outrage

It is with utter disgust that my husband, former Superintendent Kruger of the Commercial Branch, and I have just discovered that completely fallacious information had been published about him in nose91 (Why the Israeli mafia hit Winnie’s friend, May 2007).

Your journalist’s skills and sources are seriously questionable. The fact that a paper could be allowed to run an article without proper investigation of the facts, boils down to an act that is, in itself, unconstitutional. This article boils down to slander of a public servant’s integrity and is not taken lightly.

You are hereby requested to immediately retract the slanderous statement, by way of an apology, to be published by no later than close of business on 7 October 2015, as your incorrect facts have harmed the reputation of an individual who duly served his country.

In the absence of my husband being allowed to rectify the situation by way of an interview, you will be summoned to compensate this violation of my [sic] his rights. We await your call regarding the interview, and confirm that he is available for such, during the course of the next week.

I trust that we shall hear from your offices, in order to set the record straight, once and for all.

Lucinda Kruger
Lucinda Kruger Attorneys,
Benoni


We hope to be setting up an interview with the superintendent in the near future and are positively itching to hear the veteran crime-buster’s memories of Joburg’s colourful gangland past.

While researching this story back in 2007 we were unsuccessful in contacting Supt Hans Kruger,  but a reliable source involved  in the police investigation into the  fake R5 coin scam told us how the superintendent managed to persuade Hazel Crane’s lover,  Voitec, (real name Wosiewich Pierun) to turn State witness against the scam’s mastermind, Israeli mafia thug Zion Malka.

It was widely believed that it was this “selling out” of Malka, who eventually got eight years for  minting and issuing the fake coins, that cost Hazel Crane her life  (she was gunned down by a mystery assassin in November 2003).

Far from our story defaming the good Super, surely persuading Voitec to take a Section 204 was and is accepted police procedure to assist the securing of a conviction?

Letting Hazel Crane off the hook  in exchange for Voitec’s cooperation to snare the big fish was no big deal and in no way reflects adversely on Supt Kruger.

Crane’s role in the scam had been peripheral at best.

But, eight years for issue 91 to reach the Krugers in Gauteng?The circulation department is slipping again.

What better proof that the story did him/her no damage.Ed.


Passports

My fingers have lost hold
on their identity.
Their grip has loosened
and their patterns have become less clear.
Ridges once firm – loops, arches, whorls
are undermined, worn out
and smoothed with toil.
Their individuality has blurred
and now no longer corresponds
to what was stored on file.

And as I scrabble among exhumed memories,
I lift impressions from
the things I’ve touched and try
to find what I can recognize
as saying –
This is me.

    By Margaret Clough
from The Last to Leave, Modjaji Books
 

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