Letters

Dear Editor


Mazeltov
I’ve been an avid reader since your very first issues – not easy to obtain in those days, as only a few bookstores were prepared to sell noseweek.

So I say: Mazeltov on your 100th issue! May the next 100 be as fearlessly revealing. For I fear if we needed you then, we’ll need you even more in the future.

With the Scorpions gone, only you are left to expose the rampant corruption and dishonesty that we face daily – truly a case of “Cry the beloved Country.”

We are depending on you.
Eric Rosendorff
Johannesburg

Congratulations
Congratulations on reaching issue 100! What a pleasure it has been being a subscriber from issue 1. (How the time has flown!) I look forward to each issue, and find the variety always interesting. Thank you too for putting in the odd piece I’ve referred to you – makes me feel I’ve been a modest part of your great achievement.

noseweek must rank as one of the very best of its kind anywhere in the world. In fact I don’t know of any magazine that can compare – none have quite your mix and angles.
I am also very much encouraged by what you said in your most recent issue about Mbeki and the ANC being intrinsically corrupt. Working as I have for 25 years at the University of Zululand, I have seen the disillusion, and then as the years pass the sinking into excuses of decent rank and file ANC members. I have also seen how corruption has permeated Nehawu, the union on campus. The leadership of the ANC has normalised corruption at all levels.

It is right to locate South African corruption in a global context. Seeing the monumental corruption of the Bush/Cheney regime, and the corruption in the UK government, and in France and Italy (and where else not?) one realises we are dealing with a phase of history with dire consequences. Giving the detail as you do concretizes the phenomenon in terms people can understand. But it is vital that people also realise it is a function of over-consumption and greed, which is inherent in the capitalist system itself.

Thank you for all those inspiring years and best wishes for the future.
Jim Phelps
Empangeni

Biggest fish still swimming
I look forward to noseweek’s parties in June, and the opportunity to raise our glasses in hope that South Africa’s chief crook ends his presidency behind bars. The arms deal has been the ANC’s betrayal of the struggle against apartheid. As you point out (Editorial, nose100), Jacob Zuma is a very small fish – scapegoated to divert attention from Thabo Mbeki’s much greater culpability. Have you heard the latest allegations about massive offshore trust funds?

Terry Crawford-Browne
Milnerton
Thank you all. Instead of blowing our own trumpet, we’ve called in a band of well-known trumpeters to herald in our new century. See pages 18–29. Ed.

African Bank pessimism
Your exposé of the lending practices of African Bank (nose100) makes interesting reading.
Notwithstanding the “juicy pickings” from Saambou, massive interest rates and low bad debt provisions suggest something far more sinister on the horizon. Huge arrears and massive new advances financed by third parties could, in today’s high interest environment, indicate another banking casualty.

I hope not.

“Dave”
Johannesburg

Losing sense daily
Some things happening in our society today defy logic and common sense. Consider the recent bread price fixing: The consumer gets ripped off paying too much for bread. The producer yields a monopoly profit, which results in more tax for the fiscus; the competition board then slaps a penalty on the producer, resulting in more money for the state. So, what happens? The producer ups his price again – basic accounting logic – to cover the cost of the fines and legal expenses! The consumer who was paying too much for his bread now pays even more. The sole benefactor of the exercise is the fiscus.
And the electric power debacle?

“Economic growth caused the supply of power to be inadequate,” claims our new hero JZ. But some basic facts, a bit of common sense and a few calculations on a scrap of paper quickly prove Mr Zuma wrong. R60bn spent on weapons, R70bn on Gautrain, R90bn on stadiums, a couple of billion more on covering up the Coega harbour disaster – clearly this has a lot more to do with it.

Who are to blame? The uninformed electorate. Every time there is an interview and the respondents utters: “The government must do more”, the government gets another ticket to screw society.

Albertus Ziervogel
Cape Town
The directors and responsible executives should have been fined personally. Seize their shares, bonuses and flashy cars, say I. Ed.

Suckered by Rennie
I read “How Fedbond bankrolled dicey developer” (nose99), and finally realised how Craig Rennie operates. I am one of 20 investors suckered by him into investing in a development called Craig Park in Scottburgh. When two years passed without anything happening, we became suspicious and demanded our deposits back.

There are still some whose deposits have not been refunded as they took advice from attorney Pierre Grové’s office not to withdraw their investment. They were assured that the development would soon be proclaimed and that they would have forfeited the opportunity to make good profits. Obviously that was false. Craig Rennie was not allowed to sell any stands in the development as he did not own the property.

AF van Niekerk
Pretoria

Poisonous rumours
Thank you for the insights about Riebeek Kasteel, where I have lived for almost 24 years, next to a farmer who sprays every harvest. Knowing that I am being poisoned is terrible.

The only problem is: you have no proof! You only have rumours, so, before you have physical proof, please stop publishing articles that may cause tourists to think twice about visiting our beautiful town. Mr Vlok is well respected, he will not poison himself and his workers to get a good harvest. (Did you know that Mr Vlok sprayed water on his grapes some time ago, and the next day Schirmacher sent a doctor’s letter stating that his child had been poisoned?) Come on people, find another town to gossip about! If someone can prove that we are being poisoned, then I will stand by you 100%, otherwise please just let us live the country life.


Marené Wentzel
By email
More of the same rumour that we’ve heard for months. We note you’re also in the wine industry. We have doctors’ letters, video evidence, and letters from Vlok himself stating that he uses extremely poisonous chemicals, some of which are banned overseas, and which several studies show cause severe allergic reactions. Ed.

Hummer bummer
“C for yourself, I’ve cancelled my cellphone contract!”

According to the Cape Times, that’s the message for Cell C from environment-conscious subscribers who object to its glamourising GM’s Hummer in its ads.

As NoseArk reported earlier, the American SUV has an unhappy reputation as an environmentally unfriendly gas-guzzler and military machine.

The latest anti-Hummer campaign has finally driven GM’s product communications manager, Tim Hendon, to talk about the “many misperceptions” in the marketplace about the Hummer H3.

“Many believe the H3 has a power plant of locomotive proportions, casting plumes of toxic gas into the environment, its engine consuming fuel in barrel-sized gulps,” he now says.

"The truth is that the 3,7 litre Hummer H3 engine consumes the same amount of fuel and emits the same amount of carbon as any other vehicle in its class.”

As if that’s an answer. The problem is precisely with the class of vehicle to which the Hummer belongs: all in that class consume fuel in barrel-sized gulps, casting plumes of toxic gas into the environment. The Hummer’s ostensibly modest 3,7 litre engine ... is still more than twice the size of the engines used to power most family sedans.

There’s no misperception: the Hummer is a bummer and Cell C needs to be dumped for being so insistently dumb.
Pip
Cape Town

Any honest banks?

After the disclosures regarding FirstRand I am seriously considering my resignation from their client list, but am struggling to find a bank of integrity which puts its client’s interests first. Can anyone help?

Roy de Vos
Fresnaye, Cape Town
See Editorial.Ed.

Or is that an oxymoron?
I am looking for an honest bank. Does such a species still exist? This is a genuine question and I would love an answer from you.

Even if it’s the one with the least black marks on its reputation.

Nick Milaras
Johannesburg

Would you swallow this?

I complained to SAA cabin crew about the less than desirable (ok, downright nauseating) “meal” that I’ve received on a number of flights in the last few months.

The captain happened to be there (we’d already landed) and suggested that I pack the offensive “food” in a hermetically sealed container of sorts and post it to you.
Would you be interested in this?

Brian Cox
By email
No! You don’t want it on board; I want it even less in my postbox. I suggest you try another airline. Ed

The noseweek solution
On the day of the President’s address I was despondent, for two reasons: firstly the address itself and secondly, my noseweek had not yet arrived in the post.

I phoned noseweek and explained my predicament to Nicci. Without hesitation she offered to deliver the missing issue personally, late on that Friday afternoon. What service!

Inadvertantly she offered the solution to the woes of this country. If only the government, too, would respond to the call of duty without hesitation!

Len Bloch
Cape Town
Thank you for your kind note. We think Nicci’s great, too! Ed.

Cold comfort?
Zuma is going to do his bit for the electricity crisis. In future he will only be taking cold showers...

Adam
McGregor
With his multitude of wives, it’s an unlikely prospect. Ed.

Anyone know whereabouts?
I was sequestrated in 1998. To establish that my “automatic rehabilitation” is in place, I need to contact the trustee of my insolvent estate, Stephen Leith Anticevich of the Admiral Trust, who seems to have vanished into thin air – except for a mention in nose41. Would anyone knowing his whereabouts please let me know?

Ruth Longridge
ruthlongridge@gmail.com

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Submitted by : Philip Lourens of Centurion on 2010-01-14 06:36:00
Anyone know whereabouts?
I was sequestrated in 1998. To establish that my “automatic rehabilitation” is in place, I need to contact the trustee of my insolvent estate, Stephen Leith Anticevich of the Admiral Trust, who seems to have vanished into thin air – except for a mention in nose41. Would anyone knowing his whereabouts please let me know?

Dear Editor, I know exactly where this liquidator - mr. S.L. Anticevich - is !

Please this individual to contact me on 082 893 5176 or philip@pjl.co.za and I will gladly assist him in his endeavour to locate this individual.

Editor's Note
Thanks Philip, we are sure Ruth would be appreciate your assistance.

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