Wits football legend vs ex-wife

Wits football legend vs ex-wife

Red Card for Roan?

'Jealous' football legend sues ex-wife for allegedly stolen millions – or is he simply on a campaign to destroy her? Jack Lundin investigates.


Football legend Roan Maulgue says he never checked his bank balance – not once – in 16 years. He claims he made no withdrawals either, living for years on cash, while millions upon millions clocked up in his retirement kitty.

Imagine the former Wits captain’s surprise when he learned that his Standard Bank account wasn’t an estimated R31 million in credit. It was R237,000 in the red!

As far as Maulgue is concerned, there’s only one person in the frame – his former wife Lindsay van den Broeck, in league with Standard Bank. He’s filed a high court claim against both for a loss of R10,3m.

But is his extraordinary story true? No, it’s all rubbish, declares ex-wife Lindsay van den Broeck, whose Futurevista company offers packaged  computer learning centres to schools across south Johannesburg. She claims that Maulgue is on a mission to destroy her after she became engaged to the new man in her life, veterinarian Dr Neil Bouwer.

Here are the facts: readers must decide for themselves.

 

Dog eat dog

Dog eat dog

Nedbank and lawyers fought each other bitterly over R26m fraud. The chief villain is out of jail – but the loot is still missing.  By Jack Lundin

If there’s a sub-species more loathed and despised than banks, it has to be lawyers – both cadres decidedly less than human for their heartless, money-grubbing ways. So when Nedbank fell out with attorneys Findlay & Niemeyer the battle, as can be expected when worms turn on each other, was a bitter one.

Back in 2009 Noseweek revealed Nedbank’s then best-kept secret: that 15 of its staff, some at senior management level, were under investigation for their roles in a R26.7 million scam pulled off over seven years by Findlay’s trusted equity partner André Croucamp (nose111).

He was sentenced to 47 years’ imprisonment, but a controversial plea bargain with the state reduced this to an effective sentence of just 15 years. He was four months into this sentence when Noseweek blew the story open, describing the fraud-rich attorney’s sojourn in Pretoria Central in single-cell comfort, his orange prison garb hand-tailored for a perfect fit.

We can now report that Croucamp is out – paroled last year – after serving only seven years.

The Broadband Follies

The Broadband Follies

Debt-ridden Tshwane municipality eyes mind-bogglingly expensive scheme – but can’t deliver basic services.

To the man who is painting my house with skill, the fact that the Tshwane metro council is in a rush to spend billions it doesn’t have on a broadband network, means both nothing – and everything.

Like so many of our countrymen, Johannes Modise has yet to comprehend the technical buzz-words of the digital age. All he knows is that his old Nokia gives him connectivity, whether by an expensive cell phone call or the please-call-me option that he uses most of the time.

Because of its age, the Nokia’s battery does not last longer than a few hours and to recharge it Modise has to walk about two kilometres from his place to an RDP housing development where there is an electricity connection available. One of the homeowners collects R5 each time the Nokia is charged, blood money for the 73-year-old pensioner who survives on odd painting jobs and a government grant. But phoning some of his previous customers might just get Modise another piece-job and put food on the table for another day or two.

The place Modise calls home falls within the borders of the City of Tshwane, the ANC-run metro municipality that governs Pretoria. His house is not a makeshift one; he proudly built it himself a long time ago with bricks and mortar. But like his next-door neighbours, Modise is yet to get an electricity connection, running water and a sewage disposal point from the council

Rush to judgment

Rush to judgment

Neighbours fear new coal-fired power station will affect health.

Rushed plans to build a new coal-fired power station near Colenso in KwaZulu-Natal have not taken account of its impact on the environment, the health of neighbouring communities and/or the region’s already threatened water supplies.

These are just some of the points raised in an appeal to the Minister of the Environment by three citizen organisations asking the minister to withdraw the environmental authorisation he recently granted Colenso Power (Pty) Ltd. The organisations, GroundWork, the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance, and the Centre for Environmental Rights filed their appeal on 1 March.

Friends, Romans, etc  print me your ear

Friends, Romans, etc print me your ear

In nose197 Alexandra Dodd outlined the animal rights movement’s worries about the burgeoning field of medical practice that involves introducing human cells into the living bodies of animals (mainly pigs and chimpanzees) – to grow human organs for harvesting.

Dr Julia Baines, science policy advisor to PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), was quoted as saying that this new “technological sadism” could well be unnecessary. She said that the world’s most forward-thinking scientists are developing and using methods which supersede the crude use of animals.

“With more investment and use of humane, cutting-edge technology, we’ll have much better science than the monstrous ‘Frankenscience’ of creating human-animal hybrids.”

Within days of that article appearing in Noseweek, Design Indaba reported in it’s online newsletter: “A group of scientists are furthering the development of printing human tissue.”

Rhodes' real legacy

Rhodes' real legacy

In  last month’s edition of Noseweek, Peter Lewis set out to show that Rhodes’ main contribution to history was the thinly disguised form of mass slavery known as the migrant labour system – which is currently undergoing serious challenge. This sequel makes the case for reparations.

The grandness of Rhodes’ project that set in stone relations between employers and workers has only recently become widely appreciated in South Africa and the rest of the world, as thousands of mineworkers are engaged in a class action case, now about a decade old, on behalf of perhaps 500,000 of their peers, plus another 500,000 women in the rural labour-sending areas, to claim common law damages for uncompensated silicosis and TB.

These maximum guesstimates of the numbers of surviving ex-mineworkers in the proposed “class” are based on prevalence studies among them of these dread diseases, and even among currently serving mineworkers. Such studies were vetoed by the Chamber of Mines’ research funds for decades, until the onset of democracy in the 1990s.

1960

1960

An excerpt from Thula Simpson’s newly published book Umkhonto we Sizwe: The ANC’s Armed Struggle Robert Sobukwe, president of the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC), the new organisation formed by th ...

Organ exchange. Transplants and Mardi Gras

Organ exchange. Transplants and Mardi Gras

So far, it seems, so good for the largest organ exchange in Australia’s history. Late last year it facilitated 14 synchronised operations involving seven kidney donors and seven recipients at six hospitals in three cities. Under the Organ and Tissue Authority’s “paired kidney exchange programme”, a patient and his/her willing-but-unsuitable donor join forces with another pair in the same situation. The donor kidneys are a pooled resource, allocated to the patients they will suit best – significantly increasing the “matchmaking possibilities” with an extra organ thrown into the mix last year – by a 54-year-old tradesman from Victoria. He had got himself in shape to give a healthy kidney to a friend. He had lost 20kg, stopped smoking and was working on his cholesterol. But the friend received a kidney sooner, from the transplant waiting list. Doctors were amazed when Paul Bannan said: “Hang on, can’t I give it to somebody else?”

BREAKING NEWS! Did Nel intimidate mystery Oscar witnesses from testifying?

BREAKING NEWS! Did Nel intimidate mystery Oscar witnesses from testifying?

On the eve of Oscar Pistorius’s sentencing for the murder of Reeva Steenkamp it has been claimed that state prosecutor Gerrie Nel intimidated two defence witnesses by threatening to reveal devastating information about a witness’s tax affairs if he and his girlfriend gave evidence for the Blade Runner.

 

 


 
Will they hold us hostage?

Will they hold us hostage?

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Wits football legend vs ex-wife

Wits football legend vs ex-wife

Red Card for Roan? 'Jealous' football legend sues ex-wife for allegedly stolen millions – or is he simply on a campaign to destroy her? Jack Lundin investigates. Football legend Roan Maulgue says he never checked his bank ...

Dog eat dog

Dog eat dog

Nedbank and lawyers fought each other bitterly over R26m fraud. The chief villain is out of jail – but the loot is still missing.  By Jack Lundin If there’s a sub-species more loathed and ...

The Broadband Follies

The Broadband Follies

Debt-ridden Tshwane municipality eyes mind-bogglingly expensive scheme – but can’t deliver basic services. To the man who is painting my house with skill, the fact that the Tshwane metro council is in ...

Rush to judgment

Rush to judgment

Neighbours fear new coal-fired power station will affect health. Rushed plans to build a new coal-fired power station near Colenso in KwaZulu-Natal have not taken account of its impact on the environment, ...

Friends, Romans, etc  print me your ear

Friends, Romans, etc print me your ear

In nose197 Alexandra Dodd outlined the animal rights movement’s worries about the burgeoning field of medical practice that involves introducing human cells into the living bodies of animals (mainly pigs and chimpanzees) ...

Rhodes' real legacy

Rhodes' real legacy

In  last month’s edition of Noseweek, Peter Lewis set out to show that Rhodes’ main contribution to history was the thinly disguised form of mass slavery known as the migrant labour system ...

1960

1960

An excerpt from Thula Simpson’s newly published book Umkhonto we Sizwe: The ANC’s Armed Struggle Robert Sobukwe, president of the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC), the new organisation formed by the Africanists who split from the ANC ...

Organ exchange. Transplants and Mardi Gras

Organ exchange. Transplants and Mardi Gras

So far, it seems, so good for the largest organ exchange in Australia’s history. Late last year it facilitated 14 synchronised operations involving seven kidney donors and seven recipients at six hospitals in ...