Eighty-year-old widow takes on Nedbank in Jersey

Eighty-year-old widow takes on Nedbank in Jersey

After years of battling for justice, furious pensioner takes on legal and banking establishment.

Widow Dorothy Brakspear, 83, who lives in Northampton, England, is a beneficiary of two offshore trusts set up and administered by various offshore subsidiaries of the Nedbank Group. They are the Brakspear Trust, registered in the Isle of Man, and the Westley Trust, registered in Jersey.

On Wednesday, December 6, 2017 at 4:18pm Brakspear copied Noseweek in on an angry email she sent to advocate Paul Matthews, Judicial Greffier (clerk) of the Royal Court of Jersey. His main job is to guide foreign litigants in the archaic court procedures that are followed on that once-French Island.

Investigation into KZN killings on trial

Investigation into KZN killings on trial

Is the Moerane Commission an important cathartic exercise, as some witnesses believe, or is it just another fruitless enterprise likely to be buried by a compromised ANC?

Useless, fruitless and expensive.That’s what the more cynical witnesses who have testified think of the Moerane Commission, the three-person panel tasked with investigating politically linked violence and killings in KwaZulu-Natal.

But there are also those who have described the commission as cathartic. They are hoping it will reveal the perpetrators of political violence and the network of people who are paid to kill, as well as expose whoever leads and influences the network.

Established in October 2016 by KZN premier Willies Mchunu, and led by advocate Marumo Moerane SC, it is not the practical workings of the commission that lends itself to cynicism, but rather the possibility [probability? – Ed] that, if detrimental to the ANC, any significant revelations will be swept aside, played down or simply kept from the public.

Although Moerane has said the commissioners want the final report released, this is mostly an ANC problem – and a highly contentious national election is looming.

Cyril for hire

Cyril for hire

Newly elected ANC president and likely next president of the republic, Cyril Ramaphosa, is no stranger to the pages of Noseweek. Since 2005 we have tracked his rise – which is largely backed by corporate South Africa. They would hand him cash and he would provide political cover. Many have argued that he has been essentially a political negotiator-for-hire to the highest corporate bidder.

In April 2005 (nose66), Noseweek introduced its readers to the new black oligarchs: Ramaphosa, Tokyo Sexwale, Saki Macozoma and Patrice Motsepe. We called them the “jaga” – a Malay word that translates into “gatekeeper” – as this is what they were doing, controlling access to the banks and insurance companies while being supported and sustained by older capital.

The aerotropolis in Zuma's back yard

The aerotropolis in Zuma's back yard

Madcap collaboration with Russians included 100mw nuclear power station outside Maritzburg. 

A bizarre plan to build a mega “aerotropolis” outside Pietermaritzburg, to be called the JG Zuma Aviation Centre – as first revealed in nose219 – included a proposal to build a 100MW nuclear power plant next door to the KZN capital.

The entire “aerotropolis” project was officially to have been financed and built by a mysterious Czech Republic non-profit organisation called Open Doors of Europe Fund (Odef). It soon enough emerged however that Odef was merely a proxy for unidentified Russian interests – of which the Russian government was one.

KwaZulu-Natal – despite having no sites designated for South Africa’s official nuclear programme – had played host, just eight months earlier, to a secret conference between the Department of Energy and Russia’s nuclear agency Rosatom at Champagne Sports Resort in the Drakensberg.

“Project Jacob” reeked of pure fantasy. It was to include a Russian plane manufacturing plant, a rail-based coal terminal, university campus, and an air terminal with a 4km runway capable of landing international flights.

Why you should never accept a drink, a cigarette and sandwich

Why you should never accept a drink, a cigarette and sandwich

Veteran journalist and arts aficionado Len Ashton celebrates 15 years as Noseweek’s books editor. Sue Segar chats to him about his long career in newspapers and lessons he’s learnt on the job.

Trying to sum up his career, Len Ashton muses: “I’ve met extraordinary people and done some extraordinary things – a long way from Klerksdorp”. That’s where Ashton grew up, having been born en route to the dusty mining town while his parents were in the throes of moving their family there.

He and his seven siblings were born to an English mother and Irish father. His maternal great-grandfather had come to South Africa with the Coldstream Guards during the Anglo-Boer War. Ashton’s father ran shops and then worked in the mines “Ours was a very Irish family, of painters and writers – a lot of us – and part of our energy came from a determination to get the hell out of Klerksdorp!”

UPDATE: Survé keeps it in the family

UPDATE: Survé keeps it in the family

If it still isn’t abundantly clear that the press baron with a thin skin Dr Iqbal Survé (who incidentally blocked Noseweek on Twitter from viewing his account) has turned the Independent Media empire into his personal diary and scrapbook, then the launch edition of the African Independent magazine should clear things up.

NOTES: Fishy response from MTN over iPhone theft

NOTES: Fishy response from MTN over iPhone theft

On Christmas Day Noseweek reader Karen Varejes had her iPhone stolen from her handbag on the Camps Bay beachfront. She discovered it was missing within minutes and called MTN to deactivate it. Next day she dialled her number, only to discover that it had been reactivated.

UPDATE: Law Society moves slowly to get Gihwala struck off

UPDATE: Law Society moves slowly to get Gihwala struck off

The final unravelling of one of South Africa’s more famous gentleman crooks, celebrated attorney Dines Gihwala, will reach its climactic conclusion within months, when he stands to be stripped of both his professional status and his ill-gotten fortune.

Religious groups. Cults by any other name

Religious groups. Cults by any other name

In a land of crippling inequality and crime, people look to charismatic leaders to sell them the promise of prosperity and paradise. South Africa is ripe for the taking. It is no surprise that these leaders can be found housed in inner cities where the new-age church is the only source of joy on a dirty, dingy street.

I started thinking of these kinds of churches when I saw some footage of Tim Omotoso, a Nigerian charismatic pastor who operates in South Africa, where, at the end of a sermon, the self-proclaimed prophet and his entourage make their way to a German car as the large crowd of congregants literally throw themselves at him. Even as he closes the car door, others kneel at the wheels to get a chance to touch him, and many cling to the vehicle as it speeds away on a crowded Durban street.

BREAKING   NEWS: Knysna fire smokescreen

BREAKING NEWS: Knysna fire smokescreen

An elaborate cover-up is under way following Noseweek’s revelation of the findings of a secret report by a senior scientist at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research’s Meraka Institute, which confirms that a major portion of the Great Fire of Knysna was allowed to smoulder for eight weeks before it ran rogue to devastate
 

A modern Galileo?

A modern Galileo?

The backlash against Prof Tim Noakes’s ideas about nutrition is just the voice of vested self-interest. In 2013 Emeritus Professor Tim Noakes, then still head of the University of Cape Town’s Sports Science Centre, contributed ...
 
Eighty-year-old widow takes on Nedbank in Jersey

Eighty-year-old widow takes on Nedbank in Jersey

After years of battling for justice, furious pensioner takes on legal and banking establishment. Widow Dorothy Brakspear, 83, who lives in Northampton, England, is a beneficiary of two offshore trusts set up and administered by ...

Investigation into KZN killings on trial

Investigation into KZN killings on trial

Is the Moerane Commission an important cathartic exercise, as some witnesses believe, or is it just another fruitless enterprise likely to be buried by a compromised ANC? Useless, fruitless and expensive.That’s what ...

Cyril for hire

Cyril for hire

Newly elected ANC president and likely next president of the republic, Cyril Ramaphosa, is no stranger to the pages of Noseweek. Since 2005 we have tracked his rise – which is largely backed by ...

The aerotropolis in Zuma's back yard

The aerotropolis in Zuma's back yard

Madcap collaboration with Russians included 100mw nuclear power station outside Maritzburg.  A bizarre plan to build a mega “aerotropolis” outside Pietermaritzburg, to be called the JG Zuma Aviation Centre – as first revealed in ...

Why you should never accept a drink, a cigarette and sandwich

Why you should never accept a drink, a cigarette and sandwich

Veteran journalist and arts aficionado Len Ashton celebrates 15 years as Noseweek’s books editor. Sue Segar chats to him about his long career in newspapers and lessons he’s learnt on the job. Trying to sum up ...

UPDATE: Survé keeps it in the family

UPDATE: Survé keeps it in the family

If it still isn’t abundantly clear that the press baron with a thin skin Dr Iqbal Survé (who incidentally blocked Noseweek on Twitter from viewing his account) has turned the Independent Media empire ...

NOTES: Fishy response from MTN over iPhone theft

NOTES: Fishy response from MTN over iPhone theft

On Christmas Day Noseweek reader Karen Varejes had her iPhone stolen from her handbag on the Camps Bay beachfront. She discovered it was missing within minutes and called MTN to deactivate it. Next ...

UPDATE: Law Society moves slowly to get Gihwala struck off

UPDATE: Law Society moves slowly to get Gihwala struck off

The final unravelling of one of South Africa’s more famous gentleman crooks, celebrated attorney Dines Gihwala, will reach its climactic conclusion within months, when he stands to be stripped of both his ...

Religious groups. Cults by any other name

Religious groups. Cults by any other name

In a land of crippling inequality and crime, people look to charismatic leaders to sell them the promise of prosperity and paradise. South Africa is ripe for the taking. It is no surprise ...