Evidence slim for weight-loss product

Evidence slim for weight-loss product

Judge rules against herbal remedy

The ASA Code of Practice says that an advertiser must be honest, and must not make claims that are misleading. It also says that if an advertisement makes claims that are objectively verifiable, the advertiser must be in possession of documentary evidence that supports those claims, and that documentation must come from someone who is  “independent, credible and an expert in the particular field”.

So what typically happens in the world of Harris Steinman is that a pedlar of snake oil puts out advertising material that makes enticing claims; Steinman lodges an ASA objection on the basis that the claims are false and misleading; the pedlar responds with the documentary evidence that it says substantiates the claims; and the ASA makes a decision.

Reaching for the stars

Reaching for the stars

While many of us on the southern tip are gnashing our teeth over power blackouts, xenophobic rampages and fiscal cliffs, Dr Bernie Fanaroff, world-renowned astronomer and director of the South African Square Kilometre Array (SKA), has Africa aiming for the stars.

You see lots and lots of nothing… and then all of a sudden there’s this huge, high-tech facility in the middle of nowhere. Every time I see it, I feel so proud of our fantastic team – and so hopeful about what this is going to do for our country…

Dr Bernie Fanaroff, director of Square Kilometre Array (SKA) South Africa, is sitting in the busy SKA head office in Pinelands, Cape Town, talking about the remote site, 80km outside Carnarvon in Karoo, where the core of the mega-telescope is being built.

“We recently took the BRICS ministers there. They were all so excited. The British minister said: ‘we have to participate’ and then committed a million pounds…”

Could South Africa run on batteries?

Could South Africa run on batteries?

Revolutionary new storage batteries for domestic sun panels and wind turbines could transform South Africa’s power grid within a decade.

They could do to Eskom what cellphones have done to Telkom, and the internet has done to the post office – radically reduce demand for the services they provide.

Last month Elon Musk – best known in the United States for his Tesla electric car – announced that in the next few months he’d be producing a stationary battery for powering the home.

Hot water

Hot water

Reckless mining is poisoning the country’s vital resources.

Eco-tourism in South Africa is under threat. Tourism is a major source of income, out-performing all other sectors of the economy, with the Kruger National Park, one of the largest conservation areas in Africa, attracting over a million visitors a year. This income supports between 300,000 and 600,000 people who live in the park’s surrounding areas.

Such is the finding of a study commissioned by SANParks and conducted by the Tourism Research in Economic Environs and Society (TREES) whose director is Professor Melville Saayman of the North-West University’s Potchefstroom campus. 

What the Doctor ordered

What the Doctor ordered

Transcript records the sound and fury of Iqbal Survé’s rage at Independent Newspapers staffers

“Dirty-tricks. I am not a lackey of the ANC!” he exclaimed. “The Times group’s political petticoat is showing and it is branded in DA colours,” he said. “Up yours!” he told his staff. “Get lost!” he told his Cape Times editor, Alide Dasnois, claiming she was “effectively a racist, burning with hatred”. It was “hogwash” that the decision to fire her was related to the publication by the Cape Times of a public protector’s report that was damning of his fishing company.

Yes, that’s Dr Iqbal Survé, Independent Newspapers’ boss of bosses speaking.

Coal scuttle

Coal scuttle

Billions made by “strange” investors  under the cloak of black economic empowerment.

The saga of Optimum Coal is testimony, surely, to the extraordinary sophistication of some of the mind-boggling transactions that sweep invisibly through South Africa from time to time.

As part of its “BEE requirements”, BHP Billiton, the world’s biggest diversified resources group, sold Optimum Coal, a wholly-South African asset, into a BEE transaction. It is clear that BHP Billiton was interested only in the “BEE credits” it would receive for the deal, rather than in implementing the BEE deal itself.

This was and is not unusual. BEE legislation is opaque and vague, often embarrassing, and includes various heavyweight discretions for politicians.

One of the ones that got away

One of the ones that got away

JPMorgan bank mogul has a huge sense of entitlement.

Banks are under assault. That’s what JPMorgan Chase & Co CEO Jamie Dimon claimed recently when announcing the record $21.8 billion in profits that the US banking group raked in last year.

Dimon’s latest comments, which range from out of touch to outright preposterous, expose anew the misbegotten, pathological sense of entitlement that poisons the thinking of Wall Street titans.

Before I present more of these Dimons in the rough, keep in mind: JPMorgan Chase & Co is the largest bank in the US and 2014 was its best year ever.

Do I even need to point out that there was obviously not enough regulation “in the old days”?

 

Pay back the money!

Pay back the money!

Trusting pensioners knotted in banking red-tape.

The tip-off was: why don’t you get yourself to the Hermanus Magistrate’s Court on Monday?  “Someone’s bringing a Small Claims case against Standard Bank. It relates to this widespread freezing of investment money following the African Bank failure. Could be interesting don’t you think?”

Rough justice, I thought. And initial impressions did nothing to change that view. A dilapidated old building with multiple prefab extensions, cracked and dirty lime-green walls, flaking paint, linoleum floors, fluorescent lights, stifling heat, the ubiquitous picture of His Corruptness peering down at all those who dare to enter. Is it any wonder there’s no respect for the law?

Power to the people

Power to the people

By 2040, nearly one billion people in Sub-Saharan Africa could have access to electricity, compared to 290 million today.

Increasing access to energy will  “turbo-charge” growth on the continent, the International Energy Agency (IEA) says in its latest, long-range report, Africa Energy Outlook. It anticipates that by 2040, African electricity generation capacity will have quadrupled and that around two-thirds of Africans will have access to electricity, compared with less than one-third today.

The IEA predicts strong growth among smaller oil producers, a further reorientation of exports from Europe towards Asia and a vast boom in natural gas production. Analysts said they expect the current global oil price trough to be temporary and that the report’s analysis will hold. The implications of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) in China, however, will be a concern for some countries.

Honours. Oz does the splits

Honours. Oz does the splits

Treating refugees with contempt; re-writing immigration law to override Australia’s international obligations; junking the carbon tax, along with the Climate Change Authority; breaking election promises not to de-fund the public broadcaster, education and medicare; fast-tracking of dredging approvals on the Great Barrier Reef… but what nearly caused him to become unstuck was prime minister Tony Abbott’s misjudgement with the Australia Day knighting of Prince Philip, a “foreign national, earl and duke”.

Abbott, who reinstated knighthoods last year, has been widely lampooned for his insensitivity on the day designed to celebrate Australia – one that Aboriginal people call “invasion day”.

Bananas

Bananas

Gates Foundation money squandered reinventing fruit for ‘ungrateful’ Africans. Might Microsoft billionaires Bill and Melinda Gates’s plan to feed starving African children with high-tech superfoods have slipped on a banana? Nutritional tests on their ...
 
Evidence slim for weight-loss product

Evidence slim for weight-loss product

Judge rules against herbal remedy The ASA Code of Practice says that an advertiser must be honest, and must not make claims that are misleading. It also says that if an advertisement makes claims ...

Reaching for the stars

Reaching for the stars

While many of us on the southern tip are gnashing our teeth over power blackouts, xenophobic rampages and fiscal cliffs, Dr Bernie Fanaroff, world-renowned astronomer and director of the South African Square ...

Could South Africa run on batteries?

Could South Africa run on batteries?

Revolutionary new storage batteries for domestic sun panels and wind turbines could transform South Africa’s power grid within a decade. They could do to Eskom what cellphones have done to Telkom, and the internet ...

Hot water

Hot water

Reckless mining is poisoning the country’s vital resources. Eco-tourism in South Africa is under threat. Tourism is a major source of income, out-performing all other sectors of the economy, with the Kruger National Park, ...

What the Doctor ordered

What the Doctor ordered

Transcript records the sound and fury of Iqbal Survé’s rage at Independent Newspapers staffers “Dirty-tricks. I am not a lackey of the ANC!” he exclaimed. “The Times group’s political petticoat is showing and it is ...

Coal scuttle

Coal scuttle

Billions made by “strange” investors  under the cloak of black economic empowerment. The saga of Optimum Coal is testimony, surely, to the extraordinary sophistication of some of the mind-boggling transactions that sweep ...

One of the ones that got away

One of the ones that got away

JPMorgan bank mogul has a huge sense of entitlement. Banks are under assault. That’s what JPMorgan Chase & Co CEO Jamie Dimon claimed recently when announcing the record $21.8 billion in profits that ...

Pay back the money!

Pay back the money!

Trusting pensioners knotted in banking red-tape. The tip-off was: why don’t you get yourself to the Hermanus Magistrate’s Court on Monday?  “Someone’s bringing a Small Claims case against Standard Bank. It relates ...

Power to the people

Power to the people

By 2040, nearly one billion people in Sub-Saharan Africa could have access to electricity, compared to 290 million today. Increasing access to energy will  “turbo-charge” growth on the continent, the International Energy Agency (IEA) says ...

Honours. Oz does the splits

Honours. Oz does the splits

Treating refugees with contempt; re-writing immigration law to override Australia’s international obligations; junking the carbon tax, along with the Climate Change Authority; breaking election promises not to de-fund the public broadcaster, education ...